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APR
19

Lioness And 8 Cubs Pose For Pawsomest Family Portrait

Lioness And 8 Cubs Pose For Pawsomest Family Portrait

Photographer Barbara Fleming captured a once-in-a-lifetime shot of a lion family in Tanzania. 8 lovely cubs obediently lined up next to a lioness and all looked directly to the camera as if instructed.

The photo was taken 2 years ago in the Serengeti Loliondo Conservation. The cubs belong to 3 different lionesses – they’re one big happy cat family! The lionesses didn’t seem to be bothered about the photoshoot, too, they were proud to show off their little ones.

It’s especially nice to see such a picture when you consider that the population of these majestic animals is rapidly decreasing. The number of the big catsplummeted from 450,000 in the early 1940s to only 20,000 now.

More info: barbaraflemingphotography.smugmug.com | Facebook

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  9892 Hits
9892 Hits
APR
10

Swan Hugs The Man Who Rescued Her By Wrapping Her Neck Around Him

Swan Hugs The Man Who Rescued Her By Wrapping Her Neck Around Him

Swans are not particularly affectionate or approachable animals. They’re territorial and can be quite intimidating. Which is why the moment when an injured swan hugged Richard Wiese, the host of the television show “Born to Explore” is so touching.

A few years back, Wiese was visiting the U.K.’s Abbotsbury Swannery when he ran into the swan who had been injured after flying into a chain-link fence. Wiese helped to examine the swan by holding her.

“When I put it next to me I could feel its heart beating and it just relaxed its neck and wrapped it around mine,” Wiese told ABC News. “It’s a wonderful moment when an animal totally trusts you.”

More info: Facebook (h/t: thedodo, abcnews)

“I pulled it to my chest and somehow it felt comfortable or safe”


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“I could feel its heart beating and it just relaxed its neck and wrapped it around mine”


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Wiese helped to examine the injured swan by holding her


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“It’s a really terrific feeling when you feel that bond and mutual trust with this non-verbally communicating animal…”


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“…when the animal realizes you intend it no harm”


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  14010 Hits
14010 Hits
APR
07

Raven Asks Human for Help with Painful Quills After Porcupine Attack

Raven Asks Human for Help with Painful Quills After Porcupine Attack

Gertie Cleary compared the experience to a child with a splinter. "[W]hen you pull a splinter out, they holler and screech and pull their hand away," she told CTV News.

The young raven fledgling who visited Cleary's Nova Scotia home last month had just borne the brunt of a porcupine attack, and was clearly reaching out to Cleary for help in extracting the painful quills that were attached to its face.

Her daughter caught the amazing incident on camera and uploaded it to YouTube.

According to the description, the bird, which the family named Wilfred, stuck around for a day after the "operation" before flying away.

Hope for Wildlife director Hope Swinimer commended Cleary on her actions, saying Wilfred would not have survived without her help.

Quoth the Raven: "Thanks, lady!"

Watch the video here:

  3024 Hits
3024 Hits
APR
07

These Baby Bats Lost Their Moms, But They Aren’t Alone

These Baby Bats Lost Their Moms, But They Aren’t Alone

These baby bats from Australia lost their mom while they were still too young to fend for themselves.  But thanks to a group of caring humans at a wildlife rehabilitation center (true #HomersHeroes!), they'll receive plenty of food and TLC until they're old enough to fly on their own.

Watch the video here:

 

Soon, they'll be strong enough to fly on their own.

Posted by The Dodo on Friday, March 25, 2016
  2063 Hits
2063 Hits
APR
06

Penguin Swims 5,000 Miles Every Year To See The Man Who Saved His Life

Penguin Swims 5,000 Miles Every Year To See The Man Who Saved His Life

In 2011, 71-year-old former bricklayer and fisher Joao Pereira de Souza found a South American Magellanic penguin covered in oil and fighting for its life. The kind man nursed the penguin back to health and called him Dindim. After some time, Dindim was ready for the world out there, however, he wouldn’t leave Joao’s side. When he did, people said that he’d never come back. Amazingly, Dindim has returned to visit the man every year.

“I love the penguin like it’s my own child and I believe the penguin loves me,” Joao told Globo TV. “No one else is allowed to touch him. He pecks them if they do. He lays on my lap, lets me give him showers, allows me to feed him sardines and to pick him up.”

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Watch the full story:

  6310 Hits
6310 Hits
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